Pipeline Facts

Trans-Alaska Pipeline Facts

photo courtesy of wikimedia

 

 ·     Length: 800.302 miles[1]

 ·     Diameter: 48”[2]

 ·     Thickness, wall:  .462 inches (466 miles) & .562 inches (334 miles)[3]

 ·     Year Completed: 1977[4]

 ·     Construction Time: 3 years, 2 months[5]

 ·     Age in 2011: 34 years[6]

 ·     Original intended useful life: 30 years[7]

·      Cost to build: $8 billion[8]

·      Peak oil throughput: 744,107,885 barrels/year (reached in 1988)[9]

·      Oil throughput in 2010: 226,174,050 barrels/year[10]

·      Crude oil travel time from Pump Station 1 to Valdez Terminal in 2008: 12.9 days [11]

·      Number of rivers & streams crossed: 34 major, 800 others[12]

·      Number of major earthquake faults crossed: 3[13]

·      Mountain ranges crossed: 3 (Brooks, Chugach, Alaska)[14]

·      Miles of buried pipeline: 380[15]

·      Miles of pipeline potentially affected by melting permafrost: approximately 400[16]

·      Time required for oil entering the Tazlina River to enter the Copper River (using August flow rates): Less than 6 hours [17]

·      Time required to stop leak from 2001 bullet hole in pipe at Livengood: nearly 36 hours[18]

·      Percentage of US oil production provided by TAPS: 10%[19]

·      TAPS Owner Companies and Percentages of Pipeline Ownership: BP Pipelines (Alaska) Inc. (46.93%), ConocoPhillips Transportation Alaska, Inc. (28.29%), ExxonMobil   Pipeline Company (20.34%), Koch Alaska Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (3.08%), Unocal Pipeline Company (1.36%).[20]   

 



[1]  Alyeska Pipeline Service Company.  Facts: Trans Alaska Pipeline System. Anchorage: Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, 2009. 2-76. Print.

[2] Ibid

[3] Ibid

[4] Ibid

[5] Ibid

[6] Ibid

[7] Carpenter, Kristin.  A Call for Citizens' Oversight for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline: A White Paper Prepared by the Copper River Watershed Project. Cordova: Copper River Watershed Project, 2006. 1-9. Print.

[8] Alyeska Pipeline Service Company.  Facts: Trans Alaska Pipeline System. Anchorage: Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, 2009. 2-76. Print

[9]Ibid

[10] Pipeline Facts: Throughput." Alyeska Piepeline Service Company. Alyeska Piepeline Service Company, 03 Feb 2011. Web. 22 Jul 2011. . 

[11] Alyeska Pipeline Service Company.  Facts: Trans Alaska Pipeline System. Anchorage: Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, 2009. 2-76. Print.

[12] Ibid

[13] Pipeline Facts: Earthquake Protection." Alyeska Piepeline Service Company. Alyeska Piepeline Service Company, 07 May 2004. Web. 22 Jul 2011. .

[14] Alyeska Pipeline Service Company.  Facts: Trans Alaska Pipeline System. Anchorage: Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, 2009. 2-76. Print.

[15] Verhovek, Sam Howe. "Talk of New Drilling Raises Doubts on Alaska Pipeline." New York Times 11 Mar. 2002, Print.

[16]  Egan, Timothy. "Alaska, No Longer so Frigid, Starts to Crack, Burn and Sag." New York Times 16 Jun. 2002, weekend, Print.

[17] United States. Trans-Alaska Pipeline Spill Scenario -Mid August. Cordova: ecotrust, 2006. Print.

[18] Fineberg, Richard.  The Emperor’s New Hose: How Big Oil Gets Rich Gambling with Alaska’ Environment, A Status Report on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System.  Valdez, AK: Alaska Forum for Environmental Responsibility, 2002, Print.  

[19] Krauss, Clifford. "Small Leak Shuts Down Oil Pipeline in Alaska." New York Times 9 Jan. 2011: n. pag. Web. 20 Jul. 2011. .

[20] Alyeska Pipeline Service Company.  Facts: Trans Alaska Pipeline System. Anchorage: Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, 2009. 2-76. Print.

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